March 7, 2023

From The Archives: Podcasting in the Classroom - E050

From The Archives: Podcasting in the Classroom - E050

In this 50TH episode of the podcast, we'll be discussing podcasting in the classroom. We'll get into the why behind podcasting as well as the prep & tools you need to get started.

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Transcript
Rachel:

Welcome to the EDU Gals podcast. We are your co-host, Rachel Johnson

Katie:

and Katie Atwell. We are here to bring you tips and tricks to help you integrate technology into your classroom.

Rachel:

In this episode, we are gonna dive into podcasting in the classrooms. We're gonna get into why you would wanna podcast with your students, as well as how to get

Katie:

started. We thought that we would share something that is near and dear to our hearts and something that we're very passionate about, uh, because we hope that you can share this with your students and maybe start demonstrating learning in a different. So for our big episode 50, here we go.

Rachel:

Let's get started. This week Katie and I are gonna be talking all about podcasting in the classrooms. So what you can do with your students and how you can set up your podcasting assignments.

Katie:

Yes, we decided that, you know, this is episode 50 and it feels like a bit of a celebr. So we wanted to kind of bring something that we have really enjoyed doing and talk to you about how you can make this a passion project and something that students can really grab hold of

Rachel:

for your own classroom. It is pretty amazing that it's episode 50 and yeah, like Katie said, we definitely wanna celebrate and we loved podcasting. We've been doing it for over a year now, and. We've really kind of been thinking about ways that you could bring it into your classroom and how you can kind of set it up and, and do it really successfully with your students.

Katie:

And it's funny because we're so introverted, like if you know us in person, you know that we're. we're kind of the people who maybe wouldn't seem like they would be podcasters. So it just goes to show that even the most introverted people and students who may be not like, they might not seem comfortable, they can really find joy in something like podcasting.

Rachel:

For sure. You know, introverts. We close the door, and if we're comfortable with a person, we can talk for hours about something we're really, really passionate about. And Katie and I are super passionate about technology and integrating that into the classroom so we could really, really talk for hours on this. And so I think it's about finding that sweet spot, right? For. Your students who might be more reserved and not necessarily speak up in your class. It's not that they don't want to speak up or that they have nothing to say, it's just they, they just haven't had the right sort of avenue to be able to

Katie:

do that. And I think that this really kind of opens up that opportunity for them. So podcasting is great because it gives everyone a. Right. They can take on a subject and become experts and share their opinions and their thoughts. And it can actually be really helpful for

Rachel:

a lot of our students. We were just talking before this too, about going live versus podcasting as well, and I think that's maybe, uh, kind of an interesting point to talk about, right? Because we hate going live. No, maybe not hate, we're just not comfortable with it yet. And so I think the reason why I really like podcasting as something that students can do is you are taking away that anxiety and that stress of doing something live. You know, if, if they mess up with what they're saying, it's okay. You just. You know, take a pause and you start saying it again. Yeah. It,

Katie:

it doesn't have to be perfect. And for a lot of our students who are maybe a little more quiet, this could be that perfect opportunity because they might be afraid of making mistakes or being misinterpreted. So giving them the chance to prepare and then to record, but also, you know, keeping that option of knowing, hey, we can edit this afterwards. So if I make a mistake, that's okay. We, we've been on a couple of shows as guests where it's been live, and the pressure is real

Rachel:

It's very real. Yeah.

Katie:

Yeah. Like we've been podcasting for just over a year now, but I feel the pressure when I know it's live. It's scary.

Rachel:

I'm slowly getting a little bit more comfortable with Live, cuz I've done some stuff with Global Gig and I've been on the Teachers on Fire podcast once and so I've been kind of trying to push myself out of that comfort zone and do some of that live stuff, but it is stressful.

Katie:

Yes. And you have to be willing to fill the time. And I don't feel like I'm very good at that. Like if I'm searching for words, because let's be honest, there are many days where I'm like, what's the word? What am I thinking of? Yeah, no. So kudos to all of you podcasters who do it live. I have a lot of respect for you, man. Good

Rachel:

on ya. All right, so let's dive in. Let's talk about podcasting in the classrooms. So I think we've talked about a couple of our reason. About why it's good, but maybe let's develop that a little bit more first, and then we'll dive into how to get started, how to get set up, how to prep your students and some of the other resources that are available. So

Katie:

one of the why's that I think is important, Especially, and you guys hear me go off on rants and, and and whatnot about English language learners on an almost weekly basis, but developing language. And it's not just for language learners, I do have to say, um, it can be for any content course, you know, getting comfortable with the academic language within that course to a point where you can actually speak about it, explain your thoughts, share some learning. Like to me that's huge. And the more comfortable students are. Like the academic language and, and the lessons and what they're learning, the better they're going to do in retaining that knowledge and being able to demonstrate

Rachel:

it moving forward. Definitely talking about your subject matter and the language that goes around with it definitely will help you develop that language for sure. I think about science, like all the terms in science, right, and how much language there is that goes into. I think Katie's kind of taking me off on her rants, on language acquisition quite a bit, but I, I do definitely agree with them. And so being able to talk about science and being able to be eloquent and explain different scientific concepts like, What better way is there to learn about the material than to have to talk

Katie:

about it? And I think one of the other things to think about is we always talk about, you know, how can we create something that is authentic, that we could share with the real audience and have it be relevant podcasting. Like that's, that's the perfect way it actually, you know, your audience is built in, you're targeting something towards other people, so you want to make sure. You can be understood that you're coherent and your language is clear. Um, but authentic audience, it's, I think it's built right into this whole

Rachel:

mode. There's nothing like putting yourself out there and knowing that your work is out there and other people might be listening to, to it to make sure that you do a really good job on it. Right? Yeah. There's way more buy-in. I think it's also like a really kind of great opportunity for students to be able to develop their arguments and. Their logic, right? And sort of thinking about how to build up an episode and how to focus it on a certain topic and what pieces to include and what not to include, and all of that sort of research stuff that goes in. To something. I think maybe even like it's, it's a great sort of way to reinvent like the typical English essay, right? Where you're building your thesis statement, your three paragraphs with the argument, supporting your point, and then making your conclusion like, That's actually a great structure for a podcast episode. Yeah. It

Katie:

kind of falls naturally in line with that. So instead of doing it written like this could be one of the steps you're taking to help students get comfortable with that. So why not have them do, you know, answer, prove using a specific detail and then explain that, you know, but explain it using your own words and out loud, help them kind of, you know, go through that process of making sense of what they're. And making it all kind of tie together nicely. So, uh, that could be actually one of the ways in which you scaffold towards a full-blown essay. I think one other why, which I think is really, really important. Well, there's a few more, but community, and I know you may not see it right away, but if you're doing a class podcast, you are going to create such important connections between your students. It's going to become such a team effort. People are going to wanna make sure that they're doing their job to make sure it, it works and it can be successful. And the final product is great. You're really gonna work on, you know, accessing the strengths of the people in your classroom. You know, maybe somebody loves editing video and audio. Maybe they wanna take on the editing for these episodes. You know, maybe you have somebody who wants to be kind of like your main host, um, who kind of hosts these conversations with other students. That's okay too. Um, maybe somebody wants to put together the artwork, you know, how do you wanna create visuals for your episodes? Like, do you wanna have like your own logo for your classroom podcast? I don. I think it's a really good opportunity to really build relationships in your classroom, and

I

Rachel:

think you brought up a good point there, like it's also not only building those relationships, but it's building some of the skills that students might not necessarily be exposed to in their entire time that they're in school. So video editing. Audio editing and creating graphics and doing that social media kind of push and all of that sort of stuff that goes in behind creating a podcast. Where else are you gonna necessarily learn about those skills unless you're taking specific. For example, in Ontario, like specific graphic design type courses and and communication technology type courses. If you're not taking those, you're not exposed to it anywhere else. So I really like that students are indirectly learning all of these skills while also being engaged in your curriculum content and, and I

Katie:

actually think just the way you brought up the graphic, I also wonder about doing like a school-based podcast and you know, you wanna build community within your building. Maybe there's a lot of disconnect. Maybe there's just, well, let's talk this year. Like grade nines. No real peer connections unless they went to grade eight together, right? Newcomers, no real peer connections unless they've been in smaller classes and been able to get to know some of the people. Like this could be a great way to tie together so many different parts of your school community. You could have different class hosts every week posted on your school website and, and you can listen to one another. You can have topics that are relevant for the students that are in your building. You could get the graphic design class to go ahead and design some of the artwork. Like there's so many different ways that you can build a school-based podcast to give

Rachel:

students voice, and then that goes along with creating a culturally relevant system and honoring student voice as long as you're making sure that you are including all voice within your community. Then it's a great way to build that up as

Katie:

well. Yeah, no, I think it's awesome. I think that there's a lot of really wonderful opportunities built into this type of, uh, format and podcasting and there's a lot that you can do with it. Yeah.

Rachel:

And it's just, it's that little bit less intimidating. And I know I'm kind of circling back to a point we've already made, but I even think about I, in the past I've tried Flipgrid with my classes and even getting them to post a response on Flipgrid. So many of them don't wanna show their face and don't wanna do that. Like they're, they're really, really stressed about that. So I think podcasting could be a nice step to get students more comfortable with creating any kind of media that they could then maybe take the next step and start creating video to go along with

Katie:

it. Yeah, it really is like, it, it, it's done wonders. I know to my confidence because, you know, I used to go and do PD for small groups at, at our old school and, um, I remember the nerves when I was getting in front of people. Whereas now I think because I podcast with you, we've been guests a couple times another podcasts and, and we put ourselves out there all the time. I feel like I'm less nervous when I get in front of peers and people.

Rachel:

Yeah, definitely supports building confidence. definitely.

Katie:

Okay, so these whys are great. All and good. It's great to know the whys, but it's, it's important to get into the nitty gritty cuz it's not just as simple as, okay, let's hit record and start talking

Rachel:

Yeah. You, you need to go in with a little bit more preparation. Although sometimes Katie and I don't, I know, I

Katie:

know sometimes I like to make her a little bit uncomfortable and just say, okay, let's hit record now, Rachel. But, um, but no, it's, it's, when you're starting off, especially if you want this to be in a successful endeavor for students, you really wanna make sure there's more structure. So I think next step we talk about how to prepare and set up for a podcast.

Rachel:

I think you definitely need to st kind of start out with exploring the different types of podcasts that are available within your kind of curriculum area. First. if you are teaching science, what kind of science podcasts are there out there? And get your students to do some of this background research. So get them to go and pick maybe five different shows and listen to an episode or two of each to get an idea of the style and the different sort of structures that different podcasts use.

Katie:

Definitely. That's a great way. Plus then they're not only producing, but they're also kind of taking it in to get used to some of that format and to get a better idea as to what they should

Rachel:

be doing. Yeah. I've gotten a lot of inspiration from the various podcasts that I listen to and. So that sort of helped when Katie and I were talking about a structure for our podcast, how we wanted to set things up.

Katie:

That being said, when I go back and listen to episode one, because I have, I am not gonna lie, I'm so embarrassed listening to that one because you can tell how nervous we are

Rachel:

And see, I have not gone back and listened to it since I edited it.

Katie:

Oh, see, no. See, I've gone back to listen cuz I was interested to hear how we've kind of developed and become more comfortable over time. let me tell you, we have definitely become more comfortable

Rachel:

Oh man. Yeah. It, it really is interesting though, like how many different styles of podcasts there are out there. I would say, you know, the one that Katie and I do occasionally, we have guests on, and we've been blessed with having some really great guests, especially lately, but we're just sort of one style. We're like a conversational type, laid back kind of style of podcasts, but there are so many other types out there. There can be. Monologues where it's just one person talking, or it can be always interviews with guests. It could be large groups. Like there's, there's a multiple sort of ways that podcasts can be

Katie:

structured. Yeah. And I think it really comes down to who are the people wanting to record and, you know, do you have to stick with one if you're doing a c. Absolutely not. Like do it based on the students and what their interests are and what their strengths are. Right? So if one student wants to do a monologue and talk about science for a good hour, I mean, let them do that. If somebody wants to bring on a guest and ask kind of like question, answer and, and problem solve through, I mean, that's okay too. There's no right or. The point here is getting students comfortable enough to hit record and actually start talking and sharing information and, and putting together this episode.

Rachel:

I think from there then what you might wanna do with your students, depending on what sort of style they wanna go with, is you're gonna want to think about the kinds of skills that they are going to need to successfully put a podcast episode together. So, if you're going the interview route, You're gonna want to talk about what effective interview skills are like. How do you design and develop questions that you're gonna ask your guests to get that open response kind of dialogue going.

Katie:

You wanna make sure it's going to trigger some sort of. Conversation and that can actually be difficult. So you have to be careful how you ask those questions.

Rachel:

And then you're gonna want to also then think about scaffolds for some of your learners that maybe struggle with language as

Katie:

well, and pronunciation, right? And so sometimes this can be quite stressful for some students, and so making sure that they take the time to practice. And go over words and pronunciation over annunciation, which I am very guilty of, as many people have told me, especially when I say Toronto or Tim Hortons, Uh, but essentially just really making them less fearful of, you know, making mistakes and.

Rachel:

Struggling to be understood. I think my favorite is when you say et cetera. Oh, I

Katie:

know. I'm terrible. My teas. I always do my teas. When my kids were really young and learning how to speak, they wouldn't always say them, and so they, I started over enunciating everything and then it's. Just stuck. Plus teaching English language learners. It helps them with spelling when I over enunciate

Rachel:

Another area you're definitely gonna wanna explore is digital citizenship. I think this is a really great place to. Incorporate and embed digital citizenship throughout your project?

Katie:

Yeah. We need students to be aware of what they're putting out there, what information they're sharing, how they can be viewed. So you need them to be very aware of the language they're using and just to remember like, this is going it. Potentially going on the internet. It could be public, it might be private, but it's still kind of being posted. So just making sure that they protect themselves and be appropriate, which can be tough cuz sometimes they hit record and they might be fielding feeling quite bold. So just having those conversations of would you want your parents to hear this? Or your teachers or your principal or your future employer, because that's important right now,

Rachel:

I like that. That that's pretty good advice. You know, if your mom was listening, would she be proud of what you're putting out there? Yeah. Even just having that discussion around, do you even say your full name on a podcast? Right. And how much of yourself do you put out there? Katie and I are, are happy to put our full names out there. Put ourselves out there quite a bit, but we're adults and that's kind of a decision we've made. You can't really let your students decide whether they're gonna put their full name out there or not because they, frankly, most of them are under 18, the age group that we teach. If you're teaching K to 12 and you, you need to protect their privacy and protect who they. at least a little bit. And so having those discussions around how much do you put of yourself out there on your podcast, on social media and stuff like that. I think those are all really sort of natural entry points to have those discussions in your classroom as you're working on podcasting. And

Katie:

if students are uncomfortable using their name, allowing them to use a different name, there's nothing wrong with that. Like if they just wanna have like a code name for the podcast. Let them do that. Like there's nothing wrong with protecting themselves and their identity and And making sure they're comfortable.

Rachel:

Yeah, for sure. I like the idea of code names. I know

Katie:

you do. I thought you would

Rachel:

You've just given me a really good idea actually for a podcasting project in a chemistry classroom, can,

Katie:

I guess. Okay. I'm guessing you're either going to have them take on the persona of the person who identified an element or something like that. or they could be an element depending on what they're focusing on. I was

Rachel:

kind of thinking the persona of the person so they could then kind of dive into the history and the background of the scientist who discovered whatever and take on that personality and this

Katie:

could be actually really great. I love that. I know you that well though cuz as soon as I said that and saw your face light up, I was like, oh, I know what she's going to say. This could also be a really great way to infuse some multiculturalism in science too. Like let's take a look at some lesser known scientists. Why

Rachel:

not? I actually came across a really great resource. I'm gonna dig it up and put it in our show notes, but it had a list of all of the scientists that are not necessarily well represe. in our society and our, our culture. So they were scientists from like black, indigenous, racialized scientists. And so even using that as like a starting off point for your students to start exploring some of these people and their contributions to the field, I think would be a really cool idea.

Katie:

And, and this is where you can really tap into some of your newcomers. they've been learning in a whole other country, all about different, a different perspective, right? Not necessarily western society perspective on science. Like it could be very different, different people, and it's gonna be based on, on their culture as well. So why not tap into that? A lot of them are so excited to share people from their own culture or country who are considered big in the different fields in which they're working. So tap into some of these newcomers and. the excitement and passion that they have for their own culture. So let's talk a little bit about the nitty gritty of actually setting it up physically and, and what this could look like, because it can be tough. Like do you absolutely need a setup like we have with actual microphones and an interface and, and everything else, like the actual physical. Can range depending on funding, uh, depending on how long-term you're hoping this project to be. So I think it's important that we give you a few different perspectives or

Rachel:

options for sure. You can go as sample as recording on your phone and using the voice memo app, whether you're on iOS or Android or something else. You know, there's, there's always that kind of app within your phone that you can just hit record and record the audio. So you can go as simple as that and just record audio on your phone. And it turns out fairly decent in terms of sound quality. If

Katie:

kids don't have the best devices, use a Chromebook and use Screencastify, cuz then you can just go ahead and download the. as an mp3, which is great. And we never go an episode without Screencastify.

Rachel:

I was waiting for Katie to mention that. Ah,

Katie:

But yeah, so like, and that's a tool that my students know. So there's almost this comfort in using a tool they're so familiar with in a different way. So it's not a bad thing to use something like Screencastify, which may. Immediately come

Rachel:

to mind. If you're lucky enough to, and you have we video licenses, you can record audio in there too, and you can actually build full podcast episodes in We Video. So that's a really kind of cool tool to use, but I would probably not recommend unless your schools have licenses or you have a license to it. Because you do want that ability to be able to collaborate and build up these big projects. And the reason I bring that up is because with Global Gig, we created a whole we video training series, and I made the podcast episode for that one. So I'll link that in our show notes too, so that you can go take a look at how to use WeVideo for podcast. Nice.

Katie:

Um, another thing you can do is use just the computer. So when we first started we were recording using Audacity, which is uh, just a software program. We've also used GarageBand, and then I know I'm currently using GarageBand still because it works. And then Rachel actually uses one called Hindenberg where she does the editing as well. Yeah,

Rachel:

I really love Hindenberg. I was put onto this software by Steven. I actually had a meeting with him a few months ago now, and we were talking all about podcasting, particularly to the coaching role that I do because I am in another podcast. I'll, I'll link that in our show notes too. I'm, I'm gonna be brave and just link and share because it's fine if you know where we work, but anyway. I'm digressing a bit. Yeah, so Stephen Hurley suggested Hindenberg and it's awesome. It's, you can record in there, you can piece together all your episodes in there. You can do all of your editing. You can save little clips as like your favorites. So for example, our show intro and outro, I just have that saved as clip and then I just, Pace them in every single episode. It's really, really great. It does cost money, so you're gonna wanna take a look at that. Maybe go to your principal, your admin, and ask for them to pay for it, because it really is a powerful. Piece of software, and I would recommend it for anybody and everybody who wants to, you know, really, really do podcasting seriously.

Katie:

And so for those who aren't familiar with Steven Hurley, he's, uh, a big part of Voice said Canada, which kind of puts together a lot of different podcasters from around North America. Really awesome format, and they have some really great shows that you should check out. If you haven't yet, we'll put in a link for Voice Said Radio as well. Now, if you're.

Rachel:

Guest route. Then one of the pieces of software that I think is really, really awesome to record in is Zencaster. And so Zencaster had a lot of updates recently, and what it does is it's basically like a Google meet or a Zoom or something like that where you can all meet within. A room that you set up, you can see each other's video, and then it records everybody's audio tracks separately. And I think that's kind of, um, like a big one for me in terms of editing is having everybody's audio tracks separately, because then if you have to cut something out of. Out of one person. You know, you can do that without affecting the other person's audio. Or if you get those instances where people are talking over each other, which Katie and I sometimes do you can cut

Katie:

that out. Or like when my kids are coming up the stairs, like a herd of rhinos and you need to cut that out so because it happens.

Rachel:

What I like about Sand Caster too is that it's, A free version and then it's got a paid version and the free version's pretty good. You can have up to two guests, you can record up to eight hours a month. So you can do quite a bit with the free version and the audio quality is pretty good. We've used it for some of our episodes where we've had guests and we really like

Katie:

it. It's been a learning process for guests because, uh, you know, at first. Did what we do now. So we meet on Google Meet and then you know a person will use the software record, share it with us. Not nearly as convenient as end kester. So that's a great option if everybody is remote and uh, you wanna be able to get that audio easily. Now

Rachel:

I would put out kind of a word of caution here, and I think we will talk about some of those privacy concerns, but. I would as a teacher, create the Zencaster account for myself, and then I would share out the guest link and create all of the episodes in my account, and then have my students just go in. They don't even need to log in. If they have the guest link then and they just put in. Their name, they can put in a nickname maybe, or initials and you don't have to worry about exposing their kind of privacy, right? It's you making that decision as

Katie:

the teacher and, and so it really can be as simple or as complicated or advanced as you want it to be. I think the goal here is just to get kids talking. So if it's something where you start and you are using phones or Chromebooks and they love. Keep going. If they wanna take it that next step to kind of make it a little more professional sounding, kind of take it from there. But just, I would start with baby steps because you don't wanna overwhelm your students right off the bat

Rachel:

unnecessarily. And if you wanna invest in some equipment, we could talk about that. Just really briefly. I would say go and look at u SB Microphone. They're usually pretty cheap. I would recommend going with a dynamic one versus a condenser mic, just because then it tends to not pick up as much of your background noise as a condenser mic would, and so that's gonna help with the sound quality a little bit. And there's some great ones out there that are not that expensive. You can get a pretty good dynamic mic for what you're doing in a classroom for I don't, under a hundred dollars.

Katie:

Yeah, there there are some great options. You don't need a crazy, expensive microphone to make it sound good. Just avoid condensers. I mean, if that's all you have, like the, when we started, I had a condenser mic and I was in a bin that I lined with pillows and blankets, and my head would be inside of this bin in recording. So there are ways to kind of muffle and make it work less. Perhaps now we talk a little bit about privacy, because this can be huge, and I know we've touched upon it already, but, uh, the whole idea of do we publish, do we not? Is this a classroom resource that's kind of just for us. Do we wanna share it with the school or with parents? And also, what steps should we take to make sure that our students are protected? I

Rachel:

think first and foremost, you go and have that discussion with your admin, find out what is needed, what permissions are needed, and how far you can go and kind of know what those limits are before. you do

Katie:

anything else? Definitely you wanna make sure you have support and that you're not possibly putting students at risk. And so talk to the people who have all that information and, and who really have to have that on their radar. So admin are a great resource. So talk to your principals and vice principals and, and just kind of make sure you are aware of your responsibility as an educator and that they are willing to support you in this

Rachel:

endeavor. Now, we did some digging in terms of our board and what we're allowed to do and not allowed to do, and. You know, our board's pretty good about putting out a software catalog, telling us what applications we can use and all that sort of stuff. But we did some digging around permissions. And so for example, in our board at the beginning of the school year, all the students go home with a ton of forms like. It's insane how many forms that parents have to fill out for their kids. But one of those forms is a media release form. And so if students have signed off on that, then technically they have given permission to publish, for example, podcast episodes and have it out there for the world. So if you were a teacher on our board, just knowing. Those forms are being filled out and going and checking and making sure all the parent permissions have been given. That would be kind of your first step

Katie:

and, and the key word or concept there is confirm that all of your students have signed that or parents. Because just because all parents get it doesn't mean that they agree to, there's different kind of levels. Like me as a parent, I do not give permission for my students photos to be used on social media, uh, because that's just not something that I feel comfortable with as a parent. I want my kids to make that choice once they're a little bit older. So I actually say no to photos for my own kids, but the teacher may not know that unless they actually check to see what permissions parents have. and even if you do check and everybody has signed off on it. I would still do some parent communication just to make sure that everyone is comfortable and aware of kind of what the project is, the meaning behind it, kind of your goals as an educator and what you want your students to achieve so that parents are on board as well. Because if you have parent support,

Rachel:

that goes a long way. I was just going to bring that up, so I'm really glad you did is that even if those permissions aren't there, you still wanna communicate with parents and tell them about this podcasting project that you're doing, and. It could potentially be out there for the world, because even if they've signed off on that form, they may still not be comfortable with their student being on a podcast episode that's public. So I would, I would definitely go down that route too. And then the

Katie:

other thing to consider if you do wanna actually publish it, is where you're gonna host your episodes. Like what are you going to use to help store those episodes and distribute them or share them with others? Because it's not quite as simple as we've recorded. Here we go,

Rachel:

It's not as easy as honestly uploading a video to YouTube and just posting it on there. I, I actually think video production is easier in that regard in terms of where you put it, because you have YouTube, which is an amazing platform that's free, that is easy to use, and as long as your students are over 13, like it's usually okay for them to use. With some, obviously some restrictions. So

Katie:

could you put up like a visual and then add an audio track of your podcast episode to YouTube to make

Rachel:

that work? You totally could. I've seen podcasts that do that. They post their episodes on YouTube with either with just, um, still images or. they have the waveforms, the audio that makes it look like it's doing something as they're talking. So there are ways that you could use YouTube, and honestly, now that I think about it, that might be a great way to go for hosting your podcast. Yeah, that might actually be the easiest way to go. Especially if you don't want it on all the podcasting apps. You just want it public, but you don't necessarily want it on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts and, and Spotify and all of those other

Katie:

platforms. Yeah. That way you can be unlisted, share it with a link. It goes to the people that you shared it with. It's kind of, it's a little more safe and and protected for your

Rachel:

student privacy. Yeah, and I think that's why I really kind of like that idea is because it's, it can be public to whatever degree you decide, you want it to be public. So there we go. That's

Katie:

one way to

Rachel:

do it. Now our board allows us to use, SoundCloud. I haven't personally used it. I've haven't heard the greatest things about it in terms of ease of use, but it is a platform where you can host audio files and and post them there, so that could be an option as

Katie:

well. Yeah, I haven't heard too much about SoundCloud either. So I don't really have much to add there, but, but that's at least one that they have vetted and approved. And so that to me, you know, makes me a little more comfortable and, and at least I have an option. Right. And

Rachel:

there are lots of podcast hosting ones out there. We use Buzz Sprouts, but it does cost money. So that's something that you would want to think about. And then there are some that are, Free. So Anchor FM is a free platform, but you're gonna wanna dive into the privacy policies there. And again, my recommendation for any of these is that the teacher signs up and creates accounts. The students are not creating accounts on these platforms. I,

Katie:

and I think. As we go through anything where an account is needed, it should always be the teacher and never the student. I don't, I don't think it's wise to have students creating these accounts. Yeah,

Rachel:

so you could really go as big as you want, or you can keep it as tight as you want. You can, even, if you just wanna share it with your school community, put it in your Google Drive. Put the link to anyone within our board or our school, like however those permissions are set up, can view. And then you could just share out the audio that way.

Katie:

Yep. Lots of different

Rachel:

options, so you could go as complicated as you want and as big as you want. Or you could keep it tight down to just your class or just your parent community. any of those sort of ideas. So that's

Katie:

kind of, I think, the setup and privacy portion of things. Maybe just some quick little tips if you do decide to take it on. How about some learning that we have done?

Rachel:

Oh my goodness. How much learning have we done? Oh, so much Okay. So if you wanna learn a little bit more about podcasting in general, or podcasting in the c. I would say Chris Nessie from the House of Ed Tech is probably the guy to listen to. He talks about podcasting. He's, he's had several episodes and I'll pull out the ones that have really helped me and I'll make sure that I put them in the show notes. He is great in terms of knowing his stuff, and he is super, super passionate about podcasting

Katie:

and then even just on our own journey. there's this fine line of how much you prep and script uh, versus, and, and you laugh because it's been a journey. It's been really interesting kind of how we've evolved over time. I think at first we were too scripted and so we had thought too much about what we wanted to talk about and it took away the conversation. So it really is a fine line. So, Once you figure out kind of the setup of your episode and what your students wanna do, and if it's more of a conversation, it's really kind of neat to have them go through that process and, and do some of the preparation so that they're ready to, to talk about a topic, but without being too scripted as to who says what and when, and, and you know what you want them to even say. because I find that it, it could really close off conversation.

Rachel:

Definitely. I think we've gotten into a really good rhythm now in terms of our podcast, where we'll meet and we talk for maybe half an hour or so before we start recording, and we'll just jot down a few notes in a Google doc. and then we go and it's really kind of interesting because we come up with all these different ideas and we kind of feed off of each other. So I think, yeah, for sure. Having a bit of a script, maybe an outline is a better word to use in terms of preparation for your podcast episode. But then allowing a little bit of that improv and dynamic kind of conversation to happen too. Yeah. Cause

Katie:

I think that's when kind of our best ideas come out, because to be honest, a, a lot of what we spoke about today weren't actually in our outline, but it's because of the conversation that kind of came out as a result of our outline, that we were able to kind of expand and come up with new ideas and kind of think it through a bit more. So it's almost like prepping kind of the bone. like the big ideas and then having the conversations happen to kind of take it that next

Rachel:

step. So I think we're gonna wrap our conversation up here in terms of podcasting in the classroom. Hopefully we've given you some really great ideas and starting points to get started with your class. We will be sure to include all the links and resources that we've talked about here today in our show. You can find our show notes@edugals.com slash 50. That's edu g a l s.com/fifty.

Katie:

We really hope that you give this a try with your students. You'd be surprised how motivating it is and and how fun it can actually be. So hopefully you found this episode helpful, uh, and you're willing to kind of take this risk with your student. and if you think that a colleague or friend could benefit from this episode, then make sure that you share this with them. And don't forget to subscribe on your favorite podcast app so that you don't miss out on any future

Rachel:

content. And we'd also love to hear any ideas that you have around podcasting in your classroom. So if you'd like to share projects you've tried or ideas you have, or. Even podcast episodes that you've done with your students, we would love to hear them. So you can go on to our flipgrid at edu gals.com/flipgrid and leave us a video message there. Or you can go onto our website@edugals.com and leave us a written reply.

Katie:

Thanks for listening and see you next week. Thanks for listening to this episode of our edu Gals podcast. Show notes for this episode are available@edgals.com. That's e d. G A l s.com. We'd also love to hear your feedback, so leave us a message on our website, and

Rachel:

if you enjoyed what you heard, please subscribe and consider leaving a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. Until next time, keep being awesome and try something new.