June 16, 2022

Adaptive, Culturally Relevant, & Easy to Implement SEL (Grades 1-6)

Adaptive, Culturally Relevant,  & Easy to Implement SEL (Grades 1-6)

Third grade teacher Sarah Messier, and Student Support Director Lauren Reppucci, discuss how the Moozoom SEL program has effectively addressed the current mental and emotional health challenges, and correlated behavior challenges, for their students thro...


Third grade teacher Sarah Messier, and Student Support Director Lauren Reppucci, discuss how the Moozoom SEL program has effectively addressed the current mental and emotional health challenges, and correlated behavior challenges, for their students through consistent, relevant, engaging and easy to implement lessons, assessments, and flexible activities and discussions. You'll be inspired by their success stories and the shift in class and school culture.

 

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Transcript
1 00:00:01,000 --> 00:00:04,028 EPN: [00:00:01] I'm at co-host of transparency and teaching a part 2 00:00:04,028 --> 00:00:07,040 of the education podcast Network, just like the show you're listening 3 00:00:07,040 --> 00:00:10,040 to now shows on the network are individually, owned 4 00:00:10,040 --> 00:00:13,048 and opinions, expressed may not reflect others. Find 5 00:00:13,048 --> 00:00:17,000 other interesting education podcasts at edu 6 00:00:17,000 --> 00:00:24,028 podcast. Network.com.  INTRO: You're 7 00:00:24,028 --> 00:00:27,028 listening to the Ed curation podcast, we bring you stories 8 00:00:27,028 --> 00:00:30,040 from educational leaders about the instructional resources, 9 00:00:30,040 --> 00:00:33,040 practices and movements that are reshaping learning. 10 00:00:33,060 --> 00:00:36,060 I've had at least 15 students who have 11 00:00:36,060 --> 00:00:39,060 increased more than four grade levels. Used Cedar, 12 00:00:39,060 --> 00:00:42,080 is a tool to make great human beings by expectations 13 00:00:42,080 --> 00:00:46,008 are high for all of them. One of the things that 14 00:00:46,008 --> 00:00:49,008 I really love about teaching is the fact that every day is sort 15 00:00:49,008 --> 00:01:01,020 of unique and different strange KRISTI: [00:01:01] Hi, 16 00:01:01,020 --> 00:01:04,020 everyone. This is Christy your host and today we'll 17 00:01:04,020 --> 00:01:07,028 be hearing from Sarah Messier. And Lauren were Repucci. 18 00:01:07,060 --> 00:01:10,088 Sarah is a third grade teacher at learning first 19 00:01:10,088 --> 00:01:14,000 Charter, Public School in Worcester, Massachusetts, 20 00:01:14,008 --> 00:01:17,008 where she's in her 10th year of teaching. In the primary 21 00:01:17,008 --> 00:01:20,028 grades Lauren Repucci, is the assistant 22 00:01:20,028 --> 00:01:23,060 student support director at learning first, which is a K-8 23 00:01:23,060 --> 00:01:27,020 school. Lauren has been there for nine years and was the occupational 24 00:01:27,020 --> 00:01:30,020 therapist and worked in community health, prior 25 00:01:30,028 --> 00:01:33,040 To her current role. I had never actually heard of a student 26 00:01:33,040 --> 00:01:36,048 support director. And so I wanted to start by hearing about what all 27 00:01:36,048 --> 00:01:39,060 that role [00:01:36] entails, LAUREN: My 28 00:01:39,060 --> 00:01:42,060 role currently involves me coordinating. All of 29 00:01:42,060 --> 00:01:45,088 our social emotional learning services. And then in addition are 30 00:01:45,088 --> 00:01:49,000 related services to like our occupational therapy, Physical Therapy, 31 00:01:49,000 --> 00:01:52,000 speech therapy. And then any other cheered supports 32 00:01:52,000 --> 00:01:55,048 that we provide to students at our school that are not special education. 33 00:01:55,088 --> 00:01:59,008 This is my first year in it, so I started in August. Yeah, that's the first 34 00:01:59,008 --> 00:02:02,060 year schools. Have this whole [00:02:00] day.  KRISTI: Is it a new role? 35 00:02:02,060 --> 00:02:05,060 LAUREN: It is. Yeah, but it's really nice. It really lets 36 00:02:06,000 --> 00:02:09,028 somebody really focused in on that very important work. So, It 37 00:02:09,028 --> 00:02:12,028 is good, KRISTI: [00:02:10] and my guess is for a couple reasons, first of all, 38 00:02:12,028 --> 00:02:15,068 just because even prior to the pandemic social-emotional learning, was becoming 39 00:02:15,068 --> 00:02:19,040 a big Focus for a lot of schools and districts and 40 00:02:19,040 --> 00:02:22,060 if it wasn't already before the pandemic, 41 00:02:22,068 --> 00:02:25,088 it is now. LAUREN: [00:02:24] Yes, absolutely. 42 00:02:26,080 --> 00:02:30,000 KRISTI: [00:02:26] Yeah. So was part of your job in that role 43 00:02:30,000 --> 00:02:33,028 to find great resources, to help your teachers 44 00:02:33,028 --> 00:02:36,028 and students address this [00:02:34] learning. LAUREN: Yeah, 45 00:02:36,028 --> 00:02:39,048 absolutely. So making sure that Our 46 00:02:39,060 --> 00:02:42,088 teachers had what they needed in the classrooms to be able to do 47 00:02:43,000 --> 00:02:46,008 the school-wide implementation of curriculum. KRISTI: [00:02:45] What 48 00:02:46,008 --> 00:02:49,028 was in place prior to stepping into this role? LAUREN: [00:02:49] Yeah, 49 00:02:49,028 --> 00:02:52,028 so we did have we had a curriculum unfortunately, that 50 00:02:52,028 --> 00:02:55,028 company went out of business. Part of my 51 00:02:55,028 --> 00:02:58,048 role this year, was Finding, what programs would be using for next year. 52 00:02:58,080 --> 00:03:02,000 KRISTI: Sarah talked about, the needs that you were seeing 53 00:03:02,048 --> 00:03:05,060 what kind of behaviors and needs. Were 54 00:03:05,060 --> 00:03:08,080 you really wanting this curriculum or program? 55 00:03:09,008 --> 00:03:12,028 Learn was looking for to address.  SARAH: So in 56 00:03:12,028 --> 00:03:15,040 any given class room that I've been here for 10 years, so this is true 57 00:03:15,040 --> 00:03:18,048 of every single year, you get kids at all different levels, who 58 00:03:18,048 --> 00:03:21,068 have emotional needs. Some of them, you 59 00:03:21,068 --> 00:03:25,000 know, come in and they have plans already 60 00:03:25,000 --> 00:03:28,000 put in place with accommodations that they need and supports in 61 00:03:28,000 --> 00:03:31,060 this area. So, some of them, you know, just need emotional 62 00:03:31,060 --> 00:03:34,068 regulation. Some of them need to know how to interact with their 63 00:03:34,068 --> 00:03:37,068 peers. Some of them struggle, how to 64 00:03:37,068 --> 00:03:41,008 cope with different Current situations or scenarios 65 00:03:41,008 --> 00:03:44,008 happening in their lives KRISTI: [00:03:41] how big a challenge? 66 00:03:44,008 --> 00:03:47,008 Would you say? And I know you can't speak for everybody, but maybe 67 00:03:47,008 --> 00:03:50,080 just in general for you and your colleagues 68 00:03:50,080 --> 00:03:53,088 Do you feel like students, social 69 00:03:53,088 --> 00:03:57,040 emotional health, and their correlating 70 00:03:57,040 --> 00:04:00,040 behaviors? How big of a challenge is 71 00:04:00,040 --> 00:04:03,080 that in your classroom on a day-to-day basis? 72 00:04:03,088 --> 00:04:07,008 Say on a scale from 1 to 10? SARAH: [00:04:06] Oh, boy, can be a 10 73 00:04:07,008 --> 00:04:10,028 on some days. It's usually And like I said, 74 00:04:10,028 --> 00:04:13,028 students come in with their own, you know, I keep saying 75 00:04:13,028 --> 00:04:16,060 baggage, their own list of needs and 76 00:04:16,068 --> 00:04:19,068 on any given day, even just the children. Who can 77 00:04:19,068 --> 00:04:22,080 identify why? They're feeling the way that they're feeling walking 78 00:04:22,080 --> 00:04:25,080 through the door, can be a challenge. And I think 79 00:04:26,000 --> 00:04:29,028 this program is great because it's not only going to cater 80 00:04:29,028 --> 00:04:32,028 to helping the children, understand how they're feeling, 81 00:04:32,028 --> 00:04:35,060 but it also helps the adults in the classroom to facilitate 82 00:04:35,060 --> 00:04:38,060 those conversations when they're coming in the door. KRISTI: [00:04:38] Well, that was my 83 00:04:38,060 --> 00:04:41,060 question, because I've heard a lot of teachers 84 00:04:41,060 --> 00:04:44,080 say things like I'm not a psychologist. I was taught 85 00:04:44,080 --> 00:04:47,080 to teach math. I don't know how to 86 00:04:47,080 --> 00:04:50,080 address these kinds of needs on what level would that be 87 00:04:50,080 --> 00:04:53,080 true for you and your teammates? Would you say? 88 00:04:54,048 --> 00:04:57,048 SARAH: [00:04:52]Yeah so we all come in at different levels, right? You have 89 00:04:57,048 --> 00:05:00,068 teachers who you know, Lauren and I specifically have worked 90 00:05:00,068 --> 00:05:04,000 together at the school and a few different things and 91 00:05:04,008 --> 00:05:07,020 I've been lucky enough to learn a lot through her. But 92 00:05:07,020 --> 00:05:10,048 you got some first-year teachers coming. Boo, forget 93 00:05:10,080 --> 00:05:13,088 them being able to figure out where the kids are at. They're just trying to figure 94 00:05:13,088 --> 00:05:17,020 out what you said. Like how do I teach this new math 95 00:05:17,020 --> 00:05:20,040 program? This new reading program so whatever program 96 00:05:20,040 --> 00:05:23,040 we were looking for had to cater 97 00:05:23,040 --> 00:05:26,040 to teachers who are on all different ends of 98 00:05:26,040 --> 00:05:29,048 that Spectrum. KRISTI: [00:05:27] Yeah okay. And so you guys 99 00:05:29,048 --> 00:05:32,048 did settle on this program called Moozoom, which we're 100 00:05:32,048 --> 00:05:36,000 super anxious to share with our listeners and to hear more about. 101 00:05:36,000 --> 00:05:39,040 What was your criteria? You just said one of them. Really 102 00:05:39,040 --> 00:05:42,060 had to differentiate for teachers, wherever they were at 103 00:05:42,060 --> 00:05:45,060 on this learning curve. But what were some of the other 104 00:05:45,060 --> 00:05:49,000 criteria that you had around finding the right fit? 105 00:05:49,048 --> 00:05:52,080 This is Lauren. LAUREN: [00:05:50] Yeah, so in addition to that, I 106 00:05:52,080 --> 00:05:56,000 would say we wanted a program that was a highly engaging 107 00:05:56,000 --> 00:05:59,000 for students. That was some of the feedback on our previous 108 00:05:59,000 --> 00:06:02,020 program from teachers. And from students is that it wasn't 109 00:06:02,020 --> 00:06:05,020 as interesting that the lessons got stale over 110 00:06:05,020 --> 00:06:08,020 time because it was often cycling. The same lesson from year 111 00:06:08,020 --> 00:06:11,020 to year. Maybe a little bit of a tweak, but if 112 00:06:11,020 --> 00:06:14,048 you know, the kids were like we've heard this, a lot of times in the same exact 113 00:06:14,048 --> 00:06:17,060 way. So we were looking for something that was engaging for the kids. 114 00:06:17,068 --> 00:06:20,080 We were looking for something that aligned you 115 00:06:21,000 --> 00:06:24,008 wanted something that was aligned with the castle framework. We wanted because we 116 00:06:24,008 --> 00:06:27,028 do use that in our school to set goals with the kids. 117 00:06:27,028 --> 00:06:30,048 So we want to make sure like what we were teaching them in those 118 00:06:30,048 --> 00:06:33,060 SEL lessons was aligned with the goals that they were setting 119 00:06:33,060 --> 00:06:36,060 for themselves. We do that school-wide. And then 120 00:06:36,060 --> 00:06:40,020 also we wanted something that It felt feasible 121 00:06:40,020 --> 00:06:43,040 and reasonable for the teachers. There's just so many demands 122 00:06:43,060 --> 00:06:46,068 on teachers and now more than ever coming back 123 00:06:46,068 --> 00:06:49,080 off the pandemic and we wanted to make sure that 124 00:06:49,080 --> 00:06:52,080 whatever we're asking of teachers, that it was going 125 00:06:52,080 --> 00:06:56,008 to be effective. And that it was also going to be efficient with their time. 126 00:06:56,068 --> 00:07:00,020 KRISTI: [00:06:56] Yeah. And so you found something that met those criteria 127 00:07:00,020 --> 00:07:03,020 called Moozoom. So for our listeners, it's m 0 0, Z 128 00:07:03,020 --> 00:07:06,088 0, 0 m, mu zoom, and 129 00:07:07,000 --> 00:07:10,008 it's a curriculum for. What grade levels? 130 00:07:10,040 --> 00:07:13,060 LAUREN: [00:07:10] is for grades, one through six currently. KRISTI: [00:07:12] So, Sarah 131 00:07:13,060 --> 00:07:16,068 talk about when where, how does this get 132 00:07:16,068 --> 00:07:19,068 implemented? What does it look like in a classroom? 133 00:07:20,000 --> 00:07:23,020 SARAH: [00:07:20] SUre. So I'll talk about what it looks like in my classroom, but then I'll kind of speak 134 00:07:23,020 --> 00:07:26,068 to just how flexible the program really can be in my classroom. 135 00:07:26,068 --> 00:07:29,088 You use it every morning to kick off our morning during morning meeting. 136 00:07:30,008 --> 00:07:33,028 That's where we've carved out kind of our character education and social 137 00:07:33,028 --> 00:07:36,048 emotional learning block, and it takes usually 10 138 00:07:36,048 --> 00:07:39,080 to 15 minutes, each morning. We do it Monday 139 00:07:39,080 --> 00:07:43,008 through Thursday and it's really 140 00:07:43,040 --> 00:07:46,060 a flexible program because teachers can put it anywhere in their day. 141 00:07:46,060 --> 00:07:49,080 It's not a demanding program, 15 minutes of your day 142 00:07:49,080 --> 00:07:52,080 is so manageable in a classroom. Now 143 00:07:52,080 --> 00:07:56,000 if you were to extend that to a program that required you to sit for 144 00:07:56,028 --> 00:07:59,028 you know, 30 minutes or 35. That's a little more 145 00:07:59,028 --> 00:08:02,040 difficult now to make happen in your classroom, then 146 00:08:02,040 --> 00:08:05,040 of course you have to talk about engagement levels. You're not going to 147 00:08:05,040 --> 00:08:08,040 really get young kids to sit down much 148 00:08:08,040 --> 00:08:11,040 longer than that. At one period of time. The way that the 149 00:08:11,040 --> 00:08:14,048 program is designed as you could even teach certain 150 00:08:14,048 --> 00:08:17,048 pieces at different times throughout the day. So if 151 00:08:17,048 --> 00:08:20,060 you really wanted to even use it as like a brain break type 152 00:08:20,060 --> 00:08:23,060 of thing, it would be a really neat program to do that because you 153 00:08:23,060 --> 00:08:26,068 can definitely take the pieces and switch 154 00:08:26,068 --> 00:08:29,080 them around however you want and it keeps the Integrity 155 00:08:29,088 --> 00:08:32,088 of the program, the way that it was meant to to kind of 156 00:08:32,088 --> 00:08:35,088 flow together. KRISTI: [00:08:34] So it sounds like even 157 00:08:35,088 --> 00:08:39,068 within your school teachers have the Flexibility 158 00:08:39,068 --> 00:08:42,068 to implement it at whatever part of their day, or 159 00:08:42,068 --> 00:08:46,000 disperse it throughout their day if that's easier 160 00:08:46,000 --> 00:08:49,000 for them. SARAH: [00:08:47] Definitely. KRISTI: [00:08:48] So you do 161 00:08:49,000 --> 00:08:52,008 it / typically for the first 15 minutes of your day and 162 00:08:52,008 --> 00:08:55,008 what types of activities are included in that SARAH: [00:08:54] sure. 163 00:08:55,008 --> 00:08:58,020 So we always start every module, 164 00:08:58,020 --> 00:09:01,020 it starts with a main video that's super interactive in the 165 00:09:01,020 --> 00:09:04,028 kids. Absolutely love it, but it directly connects 166 00:09:04,028 --> 00:09:07,028 the theme. So for example, last week, our theme 167 00:09:07,028 --> 00:09:10,060 was bullying. We were learning. About bullying how to identify 168 00:09:10,060 --> 00:09:13,080 it is really bullying versus teasing what if you're 169 00:09:13,080 --> 00:09:16,088 on the end of bullying? So the first video that 170 00:09:16,088 --> 00:09:19,088 we watched, you would see a scenario 171 00:09:19,088 --> 00:09:23,028 of bullying on the screen. And then students actually 172 00:09:23,028 --> 00:09:26,060 get to choose the emotions that the characters 173 00:09:26,060 --> 00:09:29,068 might be feeling during different parts of that video 174 00:09:29,088 --> 00:09:33,008 or their responses. So, this 175 00:09:33,008 --> 00:09:36,008 week, we're talking specifically about kind of 176 00:09:36,008 --> 00:09:39,008 accepting know when you hear know all. All the 177 00:09:39,008 --> 00:09:42,020 feelings that can come up and we watched about 178 00:09:42,020 --> 00:09:45,020 a girl who wanted to go to laser tag with her friends and her 179 00:09:45,020 --> 00:09:48,020 dad wasn't really sure what it was all about had never been 180 00:09:48,020 --> 00:09:51,040 inside. I'm not so sure. I feel comfortable with you going. 181 00:09:51,080 --> 00:09:55,008 My classroom got to pick what she might have felt 182 00:09:55,008 --> 00:09:58,020 in that moment where her father said no to her and 183 00:09:58,020 --> 00:10:01,028 maybe it was disappointment. Maybe it was sadness. Maybe it was 184 00:10:01,028 --> 00:10:04,028 anger. So the kids really get tough. 185 00:10:04,048 --> 00:10:07,060 Have a conversation about if I were in 186 00:10:07,060 --> 00:10:10,060 a similar situation How would I feel? And 187 00:10:10,060 --> 00:10:13,060 then they get to see the character on screen feeling 188 00:10:13,068 --> 00:10:16,088 the same way. So we start out there, there's 189 00:10:16,088 --> 00:10:20,008 always some type of role-playing activity 190 00:10:20,008 --> 00:10:23,020 that you can do so later, and we usually save that for later 191 00:10:23,020 --> 00:10:26,040 in the week after they've really grasp the concept, there's 192 00:10:26,040 --> 00:10:29,060 Journal activities, their quizzes and every 193 00:10:29,060 --> 00:10:32,068 single activity, the teacher has a 194 00:10:32,068 --> 00:10:35,080 choice whether to do that activity on screen with 195 00:10:36,008 --> 00:10:39,020 her students or the students can go off. And 196 00:10:39,020 --> 00:10:42,028 independently work on those different sections which is really 197 00:10:42,028 --> 00:10:45,028 cool too because, you know, it gives a lot of differentiation. 198 00:10:45,028 --> 00:10:48,060 Sometimes you have a small group of kids who you 199 00:10:48,060 --> 00:10:51,080 want to send them off and say, okay, work on this independently and then 200 00:10:52,000 --> 00:10:55,028 you've got other kids in class that definitely need a little bit more support. 201 00:10:55,028 --> 00:10:58,048 You're able to do that with this program as well. KRISTI: [00:10:58] You 202 00:10:58,048 --> 00:11:01,060 said that you're currently looking at bullying is that because 203 00:11:02,000 --> 00:11:05,020 bullying's been an issue in your classroom or school 204 00:11:05,020 --> 00:11:08,048 or that's kind of just the next module in line 205 00:11:08,048 --> 00:11:11,068 or And you pick and choose based on the behaviors are concerns 206 00:11:11,068 --> 00:11:14,088 that you're having. SARAH: [00:11:13] Yeah. So for this year, 207 00:11:14,088 --> 00:11:17,088 just because in my classroom, it was piloted 208 00:11:17,088 --> 00:11:20,088 a little bit. After the year had started. We are just 209 00:11:21,008 --> 00:11:24,060 starting the program from top to bottom and we're going through chronological 210 00:11:25,000 --> 00:11:28,028 next year. Some of our plan is to definitely kind of align 211 00:11:28,028 --> 00:11:31,040 it a little bit with either curriculum or by 212 00:11:31,040 --> 00:11:34,080 classroom. The very first module is about changes, 213 00:11:34,080 --> 00:11:37,088 which is just makes sense, right? New kids coming in meeting a new 214 00:11:37,088 --> 00:11:40,088 teacher, maybe they Have new classmates next year will be in a new 215 00:11:40,088 --> 00:11:43,088 building a lot of new changes and it just kind of makes 216 00:11:43,088 --> 00:11:47,020 sense to have a module like that come first. But teachers, 217 00:11:47,020 --> 00:11:50,020 definitely have the flexibility to plug them 218 00:11:50,020 --> 00:11:53,040 in where needed in class.  KRISTI: [00:11:51] Okay, and then 219 00:11:53,040 --> 00:11:56,060 as it goes through each grade level, so 220 00:11:56,080 --> 00:11:59,080 your kiddos will have had Moozoom this year in third grade, 221 00:12:00,020 --> 00:12:03,048 they'll have it again next year in fourth grade, but it will be different SARAH: [00:12:02] Yep. 222 00:12:03,048 --> 00:12:06,048 They release new content every year. 223 00:12:06,048 --> 00:12:09,080 KRISTI: [00:12:06] How does this adapt for your English Learners? Or Our four-year sped 224 00:12:09,080 --> 00:12:12,088 kids are their adaptations kind of embedded in 225 00:12:12,088 --> 00:12:16,008 it or it just it just differentiate kind of naturally? LAUREN: [00:12:15] A 226 00:12:16,008 --> 00:12:19,008 lot of the features actually that you want for your English 227 00:12:19,008 --> 00:12:22,008 language Learners and you want for your special education, students are kind of 228 00:12:22,008 --> 00:12:25,020 naturally built into the program. For example, like 229 00:12:25,020 --> 00:12:28,040 the quizzes, there's always like read aloud options, just 230 00:12:28,040 --> 00:12:31,048 built in, like kids can get a read aloud. They 231 00:12:31,048 --> 00:12:34,068 demonstrate a lot of the vocabulary because 232 00:12:34,068 --> 00:12:37,068 it is so video-based, all 233 00:12:37,068 --> 00:12:40,068 of the vocabulary. He is demonstrated by the characters 234 00:12:40,068 --> 00:12:43,080 and connected which whatever students are English 235 00:12:43,080 --> 00:12:47,000 language Learners students obviously like anything else for delivering 236 00:12:47,000 --> 00:12:50,008 our classroom, you tailor it to your kids so but I do think having 237 00:12:50,008 --> 00:12:53,060 the resources be available setup and flexible 238 00:12:53,060 --> 00:12:56,060 does make that little bit easier. SARAH: Yeah, I would definitely post 239 00:12:56,060 --> 00:12:59,068 sign with Lauren on everything she just said that it's 240 00:12:59,068 --> 00:13:03,000 really just naturally built into the program even teachers 241 00:13:03,000 --> 00:13:06,028 who maybe aren't brand new teachers coming in 242 00:13:06,028 --> 00:13:09,040 who know that there's accommodations in Class 243 00:13:09,040 --> 00:13:12,048 and you've got your English language Learners. You've got your kids 244 00:13:12,048 --> 00:13:15,068 with accommodations that they need. There's not a level 245 00:13:16,000 --> 00:13:19,008 of preparedness that they need on top 246 00:13:19,008 --> 00:13:22,008 of what's already built into the program, which again, is 247 00:13:22,008 --> 00:13:25,040 really nice because it's yeah, anything 248 00:13:25,040 --> 00:13:28,080 additional that us teachers have to plan. Sometimes 249 00:13:28,080 --> 00:13:32,008 I hate to say it but sometime those kinds of programs 250 00:13:32,008 --> 00:13:35,008 take a backseat. So it's nice that this program 251 00:13:35,020 --> 00:13:38,060 never will take a backseat because it doesn't require much 252 00:13:38,060 --> 00:13:41,060 too. Meet all kids needs. KRISTI: [00:13:39] Yeah, it's that 253 00:13:41,060 --> 00:13:44,060 feeling of if you put one more thing on my plate, it's 254 00:13:44,060 --> 00:13:48,068 going up garbage disposal. I don't have the space for it. SARAH: Yeah, 255 00:13:48,068 --> 00:13:51,088 for sure. KRISTI: So, you're almost a full year end 256 00:13:52,000 --> 00:13:55,060 to having piloted. How are you measuring the success?  257 00:13:56,020 --> 00:13:59,068 SARAH: [00:13:54]So I can talk a little bit about just what? Observational 258 00:13:59,068 --> 00:14:03,000 wise, what I've seen in my class and something I haven't mentioned 259 00:14:03,000 --> 00:14:06,028 yet, either. That's so important is the kids that 260 00:14:06,028 --> 00:14:09,068 the actors in these videos are So similar 261 00:14:09,068 --> 00:14:12,068 to the kids, we have here, they use actors that 262 00:14:12,068 --> 00:14:15,088 are the same age that are going through some similar, similar 263 00:14:15,088 --> 00:14:19,000 situations, the scenarios that they put on screen are 264 00:14:19,000 --> 00:14:22,048 never these outlandish things. It's very 265 00:14:22,060 --> 00:14:25,068 situations that your kids would encounter your 266 00:14:25,068 --> 00:14:28,068 parents saying, no, or a friend on the bus, not being kind to 267 00:14:28,068 --> 00:14:31,068 you. Those are things that happen to these kids all the time. So 268 00:14:31,068 --> 00:14:34,088 the characters are their age, their characters look like them. They act 269 00:14:34,088 --> 00:14:38,000 like them one. Really cool thing is that 270 00:14:38,000 --> 00:14:41,048 I can say out of the 25 271 00:14:41,048 --> 00:14:44,068 kids that I have in my classroom, this year, all 25 of them, 272 00:14:44,068 --> 00:14:47,068 I've got buy-in from all of them. They walk 273 00:14:47,068 --> 00:14:50,068 away talking about these kids on screen as 274 00:14:50,068 --> 00:14:54,020 if their friends or comparing the situations 275 00:14:54,020 --> 00:14:57,088 that they've had in class 20. 276 00:14:57,088 --> 00:15:00,088 Remember when Daniel or when Sam was going through 277 00:15:00,088 --> 00:15:04,080 this and I think that relatability factor really 278 00:15:04,080 --> 00:15:07,080 just pulled the kids in that was 279 00:15:07,080 --> 00:15:11,000 so important to It's finding something that they weren't going 280 00:15:11,000 --> 00:15:14,008 to just be able to talk about sitting 281 00:15:14,008 --> 00:15:17,008 in that moment. But when you're at recess and you're having 282 00:15:17,008 --> 00:15:20,048 these, you know, difficult conversations, or these difficult 283 00:15:20,048 --> 00:15:24,040 situations of your friends, being able to use 284 00:15:24,040 --> 00:15:27,040 what it is, you're you've learned through the Moozoom 285 00:15:27,040 --> 00:15:30,080 activities. KRISTI: [00:15:28] Do you have a favorite success story involving 286 00:15:30,080 --> 00:15:34,000 a specific student or group of students? SARAH: [00:15:33] I have 287 00:15:34,000 --> 00:15:37,020 so many. So many KRISTI: [00:15:36] Sarah 288 00:15:37,020 --> 00:15:40,020 had two pretty dramatic. Stories that she really wanted to 289 00:15:40,020 --> 00:15:43,020 share in the first one. The class had been working 290 00:15:43,020 --> 00:15:46,088 their way through a lesson on sense of belonging the 291 00:15:46,088 --> 00:15:49,088 conversation through moves the more about when you feel 292 00:15:49,088 --> 00:15:53,008 like you aren't wanted or when you don't belong 293 00:15:53,008 --> 00:15:56,008 in a situation and there was conversation that 294 00:15:56,008 --> 00:15:59,068 even started about going through tough times. Kids 295 00:15:59,068 --> 00:16:02,068 started raising their hands eager to share times when 296 00:16:02,068 --> 00:16:05,088 they didn't feel welcome or times when they had had a hard time 297 00:16:05,088 --> 00:16:10,000 with no one to really support them. SARAH: [00:16:09] And 298 00:16:10,000 --> 00:16:13,000 divorce came up for a few of my kids, you know, and how they 299 00:16:13,000 --> 00:16:16,020 felt like a parents moving away. Almost felt 300 00:16:16,020 --> 00:16:19,028 like they as a child were being rejected in a way. 301 00:16:19,048 --> 00:16:22,048 Which one for them to make that connection. 302 00:16:23,000 --> 00:16:26,000 I was impressed that they were able to kind of say like, 303 00:16:26,000 --> 00:16:29,000 it felt like a rejection KRISTI: [00:16:26] Yeah, I mean, I think a lot 304 00:16:29,000 --> 00:16:32,000 of kids in during a divorce, probably feel that way but they don't necessarily 305 00:16:32,008 --> 00:16:35,028 the words for it. SARAH: [00:16:33] Absolutely. We had this 306 00:16:35,028 --> 00:16:38,048 lengthy conversation and one of my 307 00:16:38,048 --> 00:16:41,060 parents had text me at night and she said, 308 00:16:41,068 --> 00:16:44,080 you know, I just want you to know that the conversation that you 309 00:16:44,080 --> 00:16:48,000 had sparked up in class where my 310 00:16:48,008 --> 00:16:51,020 my son was today, she was able to come 311 00:16:51,020 --> 00:16:54,040 home and really Express to me, how he was feeling 312 00:16:54,040 --> 00:16:57,060 about his father and I who recently got divorced 313 00:16:57,060 --> 00:17:00,080 and she said we called Dad up today, we asked 314 00:17:00,080 --> 00:17:04,008 him to come over and have dinner with us and it was just a really great 315 00:17:04,008 --> 00:17:07,020 way of my son being able to see that 316 00:17:07,020 --> 00:17:10,080 this is not about you and this is Not about us rejecting 317 00:17:10,080 --> 00:17:13,088 you and we can still be here together for you. 318 00:17:14,088 --> 00:17:17,088 KRISTI: [00:17:14] This mother became really emotional talking with Sarah. 319 00:17:18,000 --> 00:17:21,000 The divorce had of course been difficult for her as 320 00:17:21,000 --> 00:17:24,020 well. And she had been understandably absorbed 321 00:17:24,020 --> 00:17:27,020 in her own, struggle to process, all of her emotions. 322 00:17:27,060 --> 00:17:31,000 Until this Moozoom lesson, gave her son, the words 323 00:17:31,000 --> 00:17:34,008 and confidence to speak with her, she had been completely 324 00:17:34,008 --> 00:17:37,060 unaware of the ways. Her son was internalizing the divorce 325 00:17:41,048 --> 00:17:44,048 SARAH: [00:17:36] That was huge and it still continues to today. The 326 00:17:44,048 --> 00:17:47,068 good news, they still have like family dinners together, which is really 327 00:17:47,068 --> 00:17:50,080 cool. And you can see the child and how he's 328 00:17:50,080 --> 00:17:53,088 just, he's been so much happier since then 329 00:17:53,088 --> 00:17:57,020 KRISTI: [00:17:54] and how do measure the impact of that? 330 00:17:57,028 --> 00:18:00,048 Yes, it's a skill that that kid is going to be able to take into 331 00:18:00,048 --> 00:18:04,028 his future SARAH: [00:18:00]  Absolutely. KRISTI: [00:18:04] The 332 00:18:04,028 --> 00:18:07,048 second story that Sarah shared involved a student 333 00:18:07,048 --> 00:18:10,060 who had experienced the death of a close family member. 334 00:18:11,000 --> 00:18:14,000 The parents specifically asked Sarah that no one 335 00:18:14,000 --> 00:18:17,000 questioned the student about why she'd been absent or bring 336 00:18:17,000 --> 00:18:20,008 up the loss or mention the event at all because 337 00:18:20,008 --> 00:18:23,008 the student was having a hard time processing and they didn't want her to feel 338 00:18:23,008 --> 00:18:26,068 uncomfortable SARAH: [00:18:23] We 339 00:18:26,068 --> 00:18:29,068 talked about, I said, you know, we're not going to always share 340 00:18:29,088 --> 00:18:33,000 the big sad things that happen in our life. But we've 341 00:18:33,000 --> 00:18:36,008 all had sad things happen in our life and this particular 342 00:18:36,008 --> 00:18:39,008 child, something happened and I'm not going to tell you what it is. But 343 00:18:39,008 --> 00:18:42,048 something happened in her life and is it's sad and it's making her 344 00:18:42,048 --> 00:18:45,048 heart hurt, and the kids were able to come up with a lot of different 345 00:18:45,048 --> 00:18:48,088 ways to show her empathy and we defined 346 00:18:48,088 --> 00:18:52,028 the word empathy and they were amazing at it 347 00:18:52,068 --> 00:18:55,068 KRISTI: [00:18:51] about a week later, Sarah's class had just finished up 348 00:18:55,068 --> 00:18:58,088 at their Moozoom lesson in the morning. And this student 349 00:18:58,088 --> 00:19:01,088 quietly approached her desk SARAH: [00:19:00] and said, 350 00:19:02,000 --> 00:19:05,000 can I say something to my classmates? And I said, 351 00:19:05,000 --> 00:19:08,020 absolutely. And she stood up in front of the class and she said something 352 00:19:08,020 --> 00:19:11,028 really big has gone on in my life. And I've been really 353 00:19:11,028 --> 00:19:14,028 sad and I haven't wanted to talk about it, but you 354 00:19:14,028 --> 00:19:17,040 all have made me feel like you care about me and I'm ready 355 00:19:17,040 --> 00:19:20,048 to tell you. She told us what had happened 356 00:19:20,048 --> 00:19:23,060 in her family. And again, her 357 00:19:23,060 --> 00:19:26,060 parents were thank you so much. Much 358 00:19:26,060 --> 00:19:29,068 for providing this opportunity because at home we didn't know 359 00:19:29,088 --> 00:19:33,020 how to talk to her about it and we haven't been talking 360 00:19:33,020 --> 00:19:36,060 to her about it. But we know that it's been affecting her KRISTI: [00:19:36] to 361 00:19:36,060 --> 00:19:39,060 students parents came to see Sarah in person a 362 00:19:39,060 --> 00:19:42,080 few days later SARAH: [00:19:40] later. They just said she's this 363 00:19:43,000 --> 00:19:46,000 whole different kid at home. It's like she just has a weight that's been 364 00:19:46,020 --> 00:19:49,020 lifted and we know it's because she was finally able to just 365 00:19:49,020 --> 00:19:52,048 like really talk about that's really hard event, that happened 366 00:19:52,048 --> 00:19:55,088 in her life and you have a lot of kids 367 00:19:55,088 --> 00:19:59,020 who Sometimes you know what they're going through and sometimes you don't, 368 00:19:59,020 --> 00:20:02,088 but move them has given us a platform to 369 00:20:03,048 --> 00:20:06,088 understand ourselves and to understand 370 00:20:07,008 --> 00:20:10,080 others. There's a lot of naming emotions. 371 00:20:10,080 --> 00:20:13,080 And okay, if you're feeling upset, let's go a 372 00:20:13,080 --> 00:20:17,020 little further. What do you mean upset? Are you angry serious 373 00:20:17,020 --> 00:20:20,028 annoyed, frustrated, sad. It's not 374 00:20:20,028 --> 00:20:23,028 just surface level. It's really digging deep. 375 00:20:23,028 --> 00:20:26,040 And I think it's bringing a lot of these kids to a place That 376 00:20:26,040 --> 00:20:29,048 they're not necessarily used to going, but it feels 377 00:20:29,048 --> 00:20:32,088 good to be able to get there.  Speaker 1: [00:20:33] I mean what 378 00:20:32,088 --> 00:20:36,000 a lesson for all of the kids in the classroom. Not just that little 379 00:20:36,000 --> 00:20:39,088 girl, right? But all of them to model 380 00:20:39,088 --> 00:20:43,000 some real true empathy and to 381 00:20:43,008 --> 00:20:46,020 just the fact that our classroom is a place where 382 00:20:46,020 --> 00:20:49,020 there is space for all 383 00:20:49,020 --> 00:20:52,040 of our feelings. And for all of who we are, I hope you 384 00:20:52,040 --> 00:20:55,040 keep a lot of Kleenex in your classroom. Oh yeah, I'll be a 385 00:20:55,040 --> 00:20:58,060 crying mess. All the time with kids, having these kinds 386 00:20:58,060 --> 00:21:02,020 of connections. You were just making me remember when my 387 00:21:02,020 --> 00:21:05,028 paternal grandfather died when I was in fourth grade. And 388 00:21:05,028 --> 00:21:08,028 I remember raising my hand in class because 389 00:21:08,028 --> 00:21:11,040 you don't know what to do with that at all as a fourth grader, right? You just 390 00:21:11,040 --> 00:21:14,068 don't know what to do with it and we're just raising my hand. 391 00:21:14,080 --> 00:21:18,008 I don't know if we were having like Show and Tell I don't 392 00:21:18,008 --> 00:21:21,048 I probably wasn't it completely inappropriate moment, right? Just 393 00:21:21,048 --> 00:21:25,008 say my Grandpa died last night and I think 394 00:21:25,008 --> 00:21:28,040 what happened was Was my teacher probably said something like, 395 00:21:28,040 --> 00:21:31,048 you know, that's a really sad thing or whatever and then carried on with lesson 396 00:21:31,088 --> 00:21:34,088 because that's just not something you did then you know, 397 00:21:34,088 --> 00:21:37,088 you just you didn't make space, right? And 398 00:21:37,088 --> 00:21:41,028 now we do SARAH: [00:21:39] And also it can be so 399 00:21:41,040 --> 00:21:44,060 uncomfortable for teachers, ya know 400 00:21:44,060 --> 00:21:47,068 how to react, but you sit there and you 401 00:21:47,068 --> 00:21:51,020 listen to the Moozoom videos 402 00:21:51,020 --> 00:21:54,088 and you go through the discussion questions and even as an adult, 403 00:21:55,000 --> 00:21:58,040 it teaches you KRISTI: [00:21:56] Yeah, and the lessons 404 00:21:58,040 --> 00:22:01,048 that we walk away with from those moments, right? The fact 405 00:22:01,048 --> 00:22:04,080 that you waited for this little girl, to be ready, first 406 00:22:04,080 --> 00:22:07,080 of all, to share what she wanted to share, and then when she was 407 00:22:07,080 --> 00:22:10,080 ready, you made the space for her to do it 408 00:22:11,020 --> 00:22:14,060 and your other kids were accustomed to 409 00:22:14,068 --> 00:22:18,008 how to respond. Yes, there is a room 410 00:22:18,008 --> 00:22:21,020 for these feelings, in our classroom versus 411 00:22:21,020 --> 00:22:24,028 the lesson that I probably walked away with was that, 412 00:22:24,068 --> 00:22:28,020 that's not appropriate. Like those feelings 413 00:22:28,020 --> 00:22:31,048 are not appropriate to share, not knocking my teacher 414 00:22:31,048 --> 00:22:34,080 at, all right? Like I'm sure he did the best he could, but just we 415 00:22:34,080 --> 00:22:38,008 walk away with lessons and so 416 00:22:38,040 --> 00:22:41,040 to create the Norms that allow us to 417 00:22:41,080 --> 00:22:45,008 walk away with skills and understanding 418 00:22:45,008 --> 00:22:48,028 and to be a more evolved person emotionally, in 419 00:22:48,028 --> 00:22:51,068 those situations, it gives us all, I think, hope 420 00:22:51,068 --> 00:22:57,020 for our next generation. Amazing 421 00:22:57,020 --> 00:23:00,040 qualitative data that you just shared. I'm curious Lauren, 422 00:23:00,040 --> 00:23:03,040 you're probably a little bit on the other side of the spectrum. Looking 423 00:23:03,040 --> 00:23:06,068 at how you, we want to measure the success of this program, 424 00:23:06,068 --> 00:23:10,028 with quantitative data, is there any kind of assessment 425 00:23:10,028 --> 00:23:13,060 or how? What kind of data are you Gathering? LAUREN: [00:23:13] Yeah. 426 00:23:13,060 --> 00:23:16,060 So I would say that quantitative data 427 00:23:16,060 --> 00:23:19,080 for SEL is something that I have been kind of working 428 00:23:19,080 --> 00:23:22,080 to get up and running because previously, we really didn't have 429 00:23:22,080 --> 00:23:25,080 a lot of assessment or like, you know, we weren't using any 430 00:23:25,080 --> 00:23:29,008 like the universal screeners for this year, they 431 00:23:29,008 --> 00:23:32,060 did like a pre and post survey for the teachers. 432 00:23:32,060 --> 00:23:36,048 And they did look at, you know, the self-awareness self-management, social 433 00:23:36,048 --> 00:23:39,068 awareness, relationship skills, responsible decision-making, and 434 00:23:39,068 --> 00:23:42,068 how the kids were demonstrating those skills within the classroom. So, 435 00:23:42,068 --> 00:23:46,000 we do have some quantitative data in that sense 436 00:23:46,000 --> 00:23:49,020 in the children, the teachers reported that the children grew in all 437 00:23:49,020 --> 00:23:52,040 of those areas moving forward. I think I'm 438 00:23:52,040 --> 00:23:55,068 hoping that we'll have some nicer data because it will be some 439 00:23:55,068 --> 00:23:58,088 more Report from internally.  KRISTI: [00:23:58] You talked 440 00:23:58,088 --> 00:24:01,088 a minute ago about as you get 441 00:24:01,088 --> 00:24:05,020 more and more familiar with Moozoom and the content 442 00:24:05,020 --> 00:24:08,060 of the lessons and things of overlapping 443 00:24:08,060 --> 00:24:11,060 this with content instruction, 444 00:24:11,080 --> 00:24:14,080 how do you envision that happening? SARAH: [00:24:14] So 445 00:24:15,000 --> 00:24:18,000 I really what pops into my mind 446 00:24:18,000 --> 00:24:21,020 are, you know, reading and like social studies and 447 00:24:21,020 --> 00:24:24,048 where you can overlap them. They're all of our reading units 448 00:24:24,048 --> 00:24:27,060 are under like these big head Adding citizenship, 449 00:24:27,060 --> 00:24:31,008 or overcoming fears, things like that. And of course, 450 00:24:31,008 --> 00:24:34,040 the book that were reading in those units. 451 00:24:34,080 --> 00:24:38,040 Go along quite nicely with usually like a social emotional 452 00:24:38,040 --> 00:24:41,060 learning unit as well. And social studies to, 453 00:24:41,060 --> 00:24:44,060 you know, you talk about government and there's plenty of things that you can 454 00:24:44,060 --> 00:24:48,028 pull out of government about responsibility 455 00:24:48,028 --> 00:24:51,028 and team, building and working together, and 456 00:24:51,028 --> 00:24:54,040 you talk about democracy, what it's in the 457 00:24:54,040 --> 00:24:57,048 realm of social studies. But Teamwork and its 458 00:24:57,060 --> 00:25:00,088 cooperation when you're talking about social emotional learning. 459 00:25:01,008 --> 00:25:04,008 So, I think actually quite easily, we would be 460 00:25:04,008 --> 00:25:07,028 able to work it into a lot of the other 461 00:25:07,048 --> 00:25:10,048 areas of study that we teach in our room, KRISTI: [00:25:10] which 462 00:25:10,048 --> 00:25:13,048 is lovely, because I feel like learning is so 463 00:25:13,048 --> 00:25:16,080 much more powerful when it's integrated that way. And it's really 464 00:25:17,008 --> 00:25:20,028 these silos of information. So who would 465 00:25:20,028 --> 00:25:23,048 you to suggest check this out? You shouldn't 466 00:25:23,048 --> 00:25:26,080 be any teacher should. It'd be 467 00:25:26,080 --> 00:25:29,080 a district level leader, who can reach out to 468 00:25:29,080 --> 00:25:33,060 Moozoom about piloting?  LAUREN: [00:25:32]  I guess so 469 00:25:34,028 --> 00:25:37,028 I would definitely advocate 470 00:25:37,040 --> 00:25:40,060 for K through at 471 00:25:40,060 --> 00:25:43,068 least third fourth, fifth grade to be 472 00:25:43,068 --> 00:25:47,000 doing this. Kids need these types 473 00:25:47,000 --> 00:25:50,028 of strategies early on, that's what that's 474 00:25:50,028 --> 00:25:53,048 when they're learning how to do this. That 475 00:25:53,048 --> 00:25:57,020 how to react to situations how to analyze. Situations, 476 00:25:57,028 --> 00:26:00,028 what kind of vocabulary words to use 477 00:26:00,028 --> 00:26:03,048 with each other and how to express their emotions? And 478 00:26:03,048 --> 00:26:07,000 I would say, any good teacher knows that 479 00:26:07,040 --> 00:26:10,040 until you are teaching the whole child, 480 00:26:10,040 --> 00:26:13,040 you're not teaching them anything, right? You're not going to 481 00:26:13,040 --> 00:26:16,060 teach a child math, Reading Writing science, social studies. If 482 00:26:16,060 --> 00:26:19,060 you're also not teaching them how to regulate their bodies, and be 483 00:26:19,060 --> 00:26:22,060 kind to one another and in social situations how 484 00:26:22,060 --> 00:26:25,068 you should be behaving. And so I would say any 485 00:26:25,068 --> 00:26:29,048 teacher Sure who really wants to have a successful 486 00:26:29,068 --> 00:26:32,080 classroom and who, if you want to get far 487 00:26:32,080 --> 00:26:36,040 academically, then let's start here. So 488 00:26:36,040 --> 00:26:39,068 I would suggest it to Any teacher who 489 00:26:39,080 --> 00:26:43,000 just wants to lay that foundation 490 00:26:43,000 --> 00:26:46,000 for their classroom. And I would see two there is like 491 00:26:46,020 --> 00:26:49,020 a free trial, so you can see examples of what 492 00:26:49,020 --> 00:26:52,020 the content looks like. So it's definitely worth like checking 493 00:26:52,020 --> 00:26:55,020 out. I do think any time when you're able to pay our like 494 00:26:55,020 --> 00:26:58,040 the teaching, In teams and the administration together to 495 00:26:58,040 --> 00:27:01,040 make these kinds of decisions. I think that's when things really go 496 00:27:01,040 --> 00:27:04,040 well, but I think they're free trial is helpful because you can 497 00:27:04,040 --> 00:27:07,048 look at at it before and then you can reach out to them at any 498 00:27:07,048 --> 00:27:10,048 time. KRISTI: [00:27:08] Yeah that is super helpful. Anytime you can do a 499 00:27:10,048 --> 00:27:13,060 free trial or a free pilot, so glad to let people know 500 00:27:13,060 --> 00:27:16,080 about that. Lauren, I should one more question for you. 501 00:27:17,020 --> 00:27:20,020 If you had to choose one thing about 502 00:27:20,020 --> 00:27:23,028 your school and your teachers experience in your students 503 00:27:23,028 --> 00:27:26,028 experience with Moozoom, that makes you feel 504 00:27:26,028 --> 00:27:29,028 like you really made the right choice on the 505 00:27:29,028 --> 00:27:32,048 resource that you chose. What is that? LAUREN: [00:27:31] I would say, their 506 00:27:32,048 --> 00:27:35,080 enthusiasm. I don't feel like you always hear 507 00:27:36,060 --> 00:27:39,080 such enthusiasm and passion about how well something 508 00:27:39,080 --> 00:27:42,088 is going from teachers or how excited that 509 00:27:42,088 --> 00:27:46,008 it's our when you speak with them. Sometimes, you know, 510 00:27:46,020 --> 00:27:49,040 you just don't get that response. So, I think hearing that from both the kids, 511 00:27:49,040 --> 00:27:52,040 and the teachers that made me feel good about the decision that we were 512 00:27:52,040 --> 00:27:55,040 making. KRISTI: [00:27:53] You can connect to Moozoom 513 00:27:55,060 --> 00:27:58,060 and set up a free trial by clicking. The link in the episode 514 00:27:58,060 --> 00:28:03,000 notes or by searching move. Zoom M 0, 0, 0, 0, m, 515 00:28:03,000 --> 00:28:06,000 Ed curation.com. 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